How to Run a Catholic #GivingTuesday Fundraiser on Facebook

Introducing the "Facebook #GivingTuesday Fundraising Guide for Catholics"

As you know, Tuesday, December 3 is #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving encouraging people to donate to their favorite non-profits.

Why is this day so important for you and your Catholic apostolate? It is one of those rare days that you can ask for donations on social media and get a very positive response.

Therefore, I highly recommend you run a Facebook fundraising campaign.

But that is not the best reason for running a #GivingTuesday campaign on the social media platform. Facebook will charge you 0% for processing donations and

… drum roll…

Facebook will match up to $100,000 in donations.

I have provided you a step by step guide that outlines everything you need to do. Check it out here:

How to Launch Your Facebook #GivingTuesday Fundraiser

The Thomist Method of Fundraising

How the wisdom of Saint Thomas Aquinas can help you fundraise

Make sure to get your free copy of ‘The 10 Commandment of Catholic Fundraising’. It’s a book that highlights the ten tasks you should do to keep you focused on your mission and hit your fundraising target, every time.

I recently spoke with the manager of a Catholic conference that aims to educate, inspire and empower her community. While chatting, she asked me how to properly train herself — and her board — to fundraise.

Their goal was to get out of what had become a ‘slump’ in their fundraising.

I am often asked, “How do I get out of my slump?” When you feel God is nudging you to ‘up your game’, do you wonder how to respond? Does it sometimes feel like the right response is to raise more funds?

Saint Thomas of Aquinas was a master at finding the right answers to the tough questions. But before he answered a question, he made sure it was the right question being answered.

Asking by the Rules: Canon 1262 and You

Following the Rules - Code of Canon Law and Fundraising

Make sure to get your free copy of ‘The 10 Commandment of Catholic Fundraising’. It’s a book that highlights the ten tasks you should do to keep you focused on your mission and hit your fundraising target, every time.

Brice Sokolowski Catholic Fundraiser

NOTICE: Have you checked to confirm that you’re allowed to run a fundraising campaign for your Catholic charity, religious order, cause, or parish?

Catholic bishops, particularly in the US, have strict guidelines about who can run a campaign. Meaning, you may have to stop before you even consider starting to fundraise.

When it comes to fundraising, we all want to follow the right protocol to make sure that people (especially bishops) understand that the money raised is going to a great cause.

Canon Law 1262 notifies Catholics that they are to give support to Catholic appeals; it also states how Catholic entities are allowed to ask for that support:

Can. 1262 – The faithful are to give support to the Church by responding to appeals and according to the norms issued by the conference of bishops.

However, this decree doesn’t apply to everyone. We all have come across causes that call themselves Catholic but, if you look carefully, they are, in fact, not. Rather, they use the label to attract the attention of Catholics but — intentionally or not — distort Church teaching and use the funds raised towards unorthodox views.

The 3 Hacks to Successful Fundraising in the Catholic Church

How to Win Donors and Take Your Mission or Church to the Next Level

Make sure to get your free copy of ‘The 10 Commandment of Catholic Fundraising’. It’s a book that highlights the ten tasks you should do to keep you focused on your mission and hit your fundraising target, every time.

Brice Sokolowski Catholic Fundraiser

Every week, so many wonderful Catholics ask me, How can I get better at fundraising? One of the most important things that you can do to make this happen is to increase your level of commitment. Many of us focus on getting others to become more committed, but this isn’t where you should start.

Fundraising is about getting people so passionate about your cause that they want to support you financially. How to do this? You’ve got to increase people’s level of commitment — one step at a time — until they reach this desired goal.

The decision to financially support your church or cause and its efforts only happen after many other decisions have been made. Until you help people reach this level, you’ll stay where you are with your fundraising.

There’s a recurring perspective in the nonprofit world that you cannot give someone anything in exchange for a donation. This notion is false because you must give every person something. However, it should not be some tangible gift. Instead, you must give the person more in mission value than he or she gives in cash value. Meaning, donors see their money going into your cause as being of more value than staying in their hands (or wallet).

I’ve got good news. If you commit to increasing your mission’s value, then you will automatically take positive steps to increase your fundraising.

Want to listen on the go? Check out the audio version of this article.

Raising your commitment to your cause

It’s so easy for busy Catholics to rush through a campaign at warp speed. They push through the fundraising without stopping to figure out where they’re going, who they’re helping, or what all these funds will help do. As a result, people are unclear about what will be done with their donations and thus hesitate to give.

I helped one diocese raise $50 million; I’ve doubled another charity’s revenue for three consecutive years; and I helped a Catholic apostolate raise six figures’ worth of donations from just one email. All of this seemed impossible to me at first, but in looking back, I realize that my commitment to sharing the value of each mission was at the core of each success.

Here are three simple hacks you can increase your commitment which can then raise the value of your cause.

Hack #1. Improve your fundraising skills

We can’t talk about fundraising without knowing how to do it. Your skills can boost or crash your results faster than anything else. Like the virtues, you’ve got to learn how to perform them. The Catechism teaches us that you acquire the virtues by learning what they are and taking repeated actions to do them. You therefore must educate yourself about how to fundraise and how to fundraise well. This is done by spending time reading, watching, and listening to training material.

I recommend registering for one of my online courses that teach you how to fundraise. The courses include major donor fundraising, internet fundraising, campaign fundraising, and how to become a success development director.

Human virtues acquired by education, by deliberate acts and by a perseverance ever-renewed in repeated efforts are purified and elevated by divine grace. – CCC 1810

Hack #2. Get a fundraising coach

I’m a strong advocate for surrounding yourself with the right people. This definitely applies to fundraising. Some people choose to hire a fundraiser, but most of us don’t have the funds to do so. The best alternative is to hire a fundraising coach who will teach you how to do it for yourself. This option is both a tremendous benefit and investment for you because the best fundraising always happens from within an organization. Donors and prospects always want to hear directly from the leadership rather than a fundraiser.

Each week, I provide one-to-one coaching to Catholic organizations. Together, we plan, develop, and launch initiatives to raise funds. To start your coaching sessions, contact me today by clicking this link.

Hack #3. Work on it every day

When it comes to fundraising, you’ve got to show up every day. You can’t leave it to the last-minute or push it aside for months at a time.

As I said earlier, people donate because they are passionate about your cause and see their money as getting more constructively used in your hands than in their pockets. I’m not saying that you have to ask people for money every day, but you’ve got to be watching who God brings into your life and how to get them involved.

Whether that means sending thank you letters, personally calling donors, or simply sharing updates about your mission, you’ve got to work at inspiring people every day.

When you inspire people each day with what you are doing to realize your — and their — mission, you are planting the seeds of your fundraising.

To learn what to do each day to increase daily commitment, I recommend ordering a copy of my book, Alms, which outlines the essential tasks any Catholic should be taking.

Here are your next steps

As a fundraiser helping hundreds of Catholic causes, I have seen amazing things happen when we increase commitment to our missions. We have more confidence and clarity in our donation requests, we gain more people around us to ask, more donors continue supporting us, and we grow more and deeper faith that we are doing what God wants.

Question: How will you raise your commitment today to your Catholic cause? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Brice Sokolowski Catholic Fundraiser

Ascension Roundtable: Do’s and Don’ts of Catholic Fundraising

I just did an interview with Ascension Press on their podcast, Ascension Roundtable.

You may be familiar with their other podcasts: Fr Mike Schmitz video series and the Jeff Cavins Show.

Anyways, I was just sharing my story of how I teach Catholics how to start and grow Catholic apostolates, and I’ve been doing it for over five years.

They asked me how I stayed on top of the game… how I stayed on the cutting edge of fundraising while holding to Catholic values.

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It’s an interesting question.

And the answer is all about my “dream list”.

Now I know that sounds like some hype term – but it’s not.

It’s a real thing, and I’ve used that “dream list” for three years now. And it’s made a huge impact on my fundraising.

In fact, it’s actually transformed the entire approach to fundraising for Catholics. You can learn more about how to build your own dream list by reading this article.

It’s a strange story, unlike anything else in the fundraising world. I tell the rest of the story in the interview.

Stay blessed,

Brice

P.S. I need to come up with something else to call it besides “dream list”… but sometimes when the sandal fits, you should just go ahead and wear it.

Question: What’s your biggest struggle with fundraising in a Catholic context?